keyword tools


GUTE-URLS

Wordpress is loading infos from spyfu

Please wait for API server guteurls.de to collect data from
www.spyfu.com/

keywords you share with competitors

what keyword is good to put your content into?

Shut down digital teams

Hurray!! “The world has become completely digital and – as my fellow Marketing Week columnist Tom Goodwin has noted – just as referring to your computer as an ‘electrical laptop’ would strike everyone as odd, using the D prefix in any marketing in the near future will come across as slightly batty.” 

Books

Start with Why’ by Simon Sinek.

This is a classic. ‘No brainer, just read it. Even better than his TED talk. “Is a customer who buys your product for a second time a loyal customer of just plain lazy?” and more of this ‘food for thought’. Simon Sinek is straight to the point and inspiring.

“Some in management positions operate as if they are in a tree of monkeys. The make sure that everyone at the top of the tree looking down sees only smiles. But all too often, those at the bottom looking up see only asses.” (page 113)

Get the book: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1591846447/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_T8wACbP6MGFTH (affiliate free link)

Why I share these books? It is the most photographed slide of my keynotes: the inspirational booklist, frequently asked and often shared. Alternating between business and inspirational motivational titles. Books in the top10 appear in random order.

17 effectivity tips

  1. Make it a goal to have no more than 10 tasks on your to-do list each day.
  2. Decide what your monthly and weekly goals are.
  3. Having goals allows you to work on what’s important to you and it keeps you focused on your priorities.
  4. By having a set of goals, you find it much easier to eliminate the unimportant tasks that come up each day.
  5. Having goals gives you focus.
  6. Begin the day with a goal.
  7. Start small.
  8. Ask yourself: What one thing you could do today that would have the biggest positive impact on your day?
  9. Small steps consistently taken leads to great distances being covered.
  10. Plan what you are going to achieve the day before with the 2+8 Prioritisation system.
  11. Know what your majors and minors are.
  12. Having goals adds positive pressure to get more done.
  13. Having specific, clear goals incentivises you to move forward.
  14. Making progress on your goals leads to more progress.
  15. Goals give you accountability.
  16. Invoke the power of Parkinson’s Law.
    Parkinson’s Law states “work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion”.
  17. You become a highly focused, goal achieving individual.

Love is a verb

We fall out of love “very slowly, then all at once.”

“Love is a verb.”

This is a beautiful description of how relationships work that accords with how so many big changes in life really happen. Success doesn’t happen overnight, neither does physical fitness, and neither does relationship breakdown. Nearly all big goals come from weathering small setbacks and making steady forward progress over days and months and years. And then there’s often one big breakthrough. Outsiders only see the dramatic final stages of the process, but the roots are generally deep.

The best part of Sexton’s interview isn’t his explanation of how marriages decay, however. It’s the solution he offers couples. It’s only four words long, so no one has any excuse for forgetting it: “Love is a verb.”

“I’m a romantic, but I don’t believe in fairy tales. I think that we sell people a bill of goods about what love is supposed to look like. Love is a verb,” he insists. “Falling out of love is very slow. It’s a very gradual process. You put on weight slowly. … You don’t just wake up one day and you’ve gained 20 pounds. You very slowly gain weight, but sure enough, it happens. It’s the same thing with love.”

And not falling out of love, like not gaining weight, isn’t about dramatic gestures or heroic acts. It’s about a relentless daily commitment to small actions. It’s about doing things — not clamming up to avoid the fight, not complaining about how the towels are folded, reaching out a hand in a tense conversation. In other words, it’s a verb.

“If you want to keep your love alive, you have to be attentive to all the little things that go wrong along the way, and constantly course-correct. If you can do that, you’ll never set foot in my office,” Sexton concludes.