Help Content

Why you still suck at your help content and ain’t got your sh*t in place. I absolutely second that, thnx Mark Schoones.

source: https://medium.com/@markschoones/hero-content-is-awesome-but-arent-we-forgetting-something-1fdb531bc6cf

“But where is the hygiene-content? The factual stuff. The basics. The answers to the questions consumers truly have? That information is often hidden on hideous service pages or user-unfriendly PDF-esque manuals. Why?”

“Finding the answer to that question isn’t that hard. See; traditionally marketers aren’t used to answering exact consumer questions. That was always a customer service thing. And Mister Customer Service doesn’t tend to have the same deep pockets Mister Marketing has. And so consumers are condemned to cheap ugly ass product descriptions and coma-inducing FAQ-pages.”

“Pity. Because answering existing questions in a consumer-friendly manner pushes basically every single KPI-button a marketer could aim for. The Samsung-campaign Android & You, a campaign launched three years (!!!) ago in the Netherlands, proved to increase NPS-scores, purchase intent ánd brand consideration. Just by offering answers to existing consumer questions. Transforming customer service into a branding tool. And decreasing the number of incoming service calls at the same time. Win-win.”

“So, how do you start? Simple. Just find out which questions your target audience has. Tinker with the Google-machine, ask your customer service department, look at user behavior on your website. Construct and test the perfect answers. In video. In written form. Whatever works best. And publish. This approach will work. Whether you sell phonessend packagesor fly blue airplanes.”

“And before the Byron Sharp brigade starts off a collective rant in the comments; I’m not claiming awareness-fueling hero-content is obsolete. But there’s something valuable lying on the bottom of the pyramid. Let’s not forget that. Because sometimes satisfying your customer is as easy as just answering a question.”

Reading is Candy for the Mind

To inspire and to be inspired, to learn and to teach, to surprise and to be surprised, to broaden one’s mind and to gain that sparkling new energy for our upcoming adventures in the Business LaLa Wonderland.

Based on the most photographed slide of my keynotes: the inspirational booklist, frequently asked and even more often shared. Alternating between business and inspirational motivational titles.

Books appear in random order.

  • ‘Start with Why’ by Simon Sinek
  • ‘Get Your Sh*t Together’ by Sarah Knight
  • ‘How not to Plan: 66 ways to screw it up’ by Les Binet and Sarah Carter
  • ‘Copywriting Secrets’ by Alan Sharpe
  • ‘Eat your Greens’ by Wiemer Snijders
  • ‘Make Time: How to Focus on What Matters Every Day’ by Jake Knapp, John Zeratsky
  • “The ONE Thing” by Gary Kelly and Jay Papasan
  • ‘Let my people go surfing’ by Yvon Chouinard
  • ‘Chasing Excellence: A Story About Building the World’s Fittest Athletes’ by Ben Bergeron
  • ‘Life Scale’ by Brian Solis
  • ‘Thrive’ by Arianna Huffington
  • ‘TED Talks Storytelling: 23 Storytelling Techniques from the Best TED Talks’ by Akash Karia 
  • ‘Good Strategy, bad strategy’ by Richard P. Rumelt
  • ‘Everybody writes’ by Ann Handley
  • ‘How to Win Friends and Influence People’ by Dale Carnegie
  • ‘Epic Content Marketing’ by Joe Pulizzi
  • ‘If I Could Tell You Just One Thing…: Encounters with Remarkable People and Their Most Valuable Advice’ by Richard Reed
  • ‘Daily Reflections for Highly Effective People: Living the 7 Habits of Highly Effective People Every Day’ by Stephen R. Covey
  • ‘Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff’ by Richard Carlson
  • ‘The Ideal Team Player: How to Recognize and Cultivate The Three Essential Virtues’ by Patrick M. Lencioni 
  • ‘Measure What Matters: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs’ by John Doerr

In addition to the books, check out my list of best apps

Continue reading

SEO tools and Audit

Tools to do research for Google Search Query, don’t know if this also works for YouTube Search Query

And some useful pointers to do an audit for SEO and Google Search.

Average

Aim for average and you’ll serve no one well

“They recruited 4,063 pilots from Wright Air Force Base, Ohio and measured them on 140 different metrics in order to estimate the size of the average pilot in 1950.

Daniels isolated the 10 most important variables – things like shoe size and leg length – and looked at how many pilots were average on all counts. He generously defined average as the 30% of people nearest to the mean.

The answer? Zero. There wasn’t a single pilot average on all metrics. Even when Daniels analysed just three metrics, only 3.5% of pilots were average on all counts.

Daniels concluded that the search for an average pilot was pointless. There was no such person. If you designed for the average user, then the result was perfectly suited to no-one.

Distinctiveness and Vanille

Dare to be different and stand out. 

“First, prioritise being noticed above other goals. If you fail there, everything else is academic.

Second, apply the findings of von Restorff, who 80 years ago discovered that the best way to be noticed is to be distinctive. Despite this finding being well established in psychology, much advertising slavishly abides by category conventions. That mimicry comes at a cost.”

Content audit

“Last June, The Times used eight freelancers and tagging tech over three months to segment 1,000 articles from the previous 17 months. Each article was tagged with 16 different pieces of metadata, included criteria like the content tone, the headline type, the article format and geography. These tags were plotted against 10 metrics that show engagement, such as pageviews, time on page, whether someone has commented, saving, sharing, whether the reader is registered or a subscriber. That information has then been used to dictate content strategy.”

“For example, over the last few months, The Times has published 15% fewer stories on the online Home News section after learning that news with no additional or exclusive content underperforms.”

“The social team has since gotten more strategic with promoting stories on Facebook based on the tone or headlines that would do well at driving referral traffic. Evans wrongly assumed that headlines typically drawing people in would drive more referral traffic.”

Insight based, tech developed

“It is built on a very simple but important consumer insight, which is when it comes to haircare consumers are very much looking for insight, inspiration, and tips from people like them.”

“This means the marketing tool needs to function much like an independent publisher working with a network of influencers to retain authenticity and build strong consumer relationships.”

“Gandhi explains: “We understand what consumers really care about and make sure we provide the right insights back to the brand. But on the reverse, we also make sure we recommend the right brands to the right consumers.”

  • founded in 2013 in Canada, global roll out
  • 30+ editorial team
  • works like a newsroom

Nike and data

The importance of data. Nike expands and acquires a data tech company for further digital expansion.