Fashion and content

  • In the past year, 40 percent of YouTube users turned to the platform to learn more about a product before they bought it. – Google
  • 52 percent of consumers are likely to switch brands if a company doesn’t make an effort to personalize communications to them. – Salesforce
  • Within six months after an omnichannel shopping experience, customers logged 23 percent more repeat shopping trips to the retailer’s stores and were more likely to recommend the brand to family and friends more so than those who used a single channel. – Harvard Business Review
  • In 2021, 53.9 percent of all retail e-commerce is expected to be generated via m-commerce (i.e., on mobile devices). – Statista

And when interacting with brands in between purchases, they’re looking to be inspired, entertained, and informed.

Fashion Content Marketing 2018: Top Trends + Leading Brands

Heineken on social


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HEINEKEN: FANS OF THE WORLD

Heineken has a huge online presence. But the truth was, it hasn’t always behaved on social media quite like the premium, cosmopolitan brand it was in real life. So a planner, an art director and a writer sat down with a bunch of blank cards. Which turned into content formats. Which turned into a global production machine that helped make the brand a little more relevant to the everyday (social) lives of its drinkers.

Purpose, content and social media

Great research on how to take a stand on social media as a brand. And the impact of the CEO on this subjects. (last half of the research)

  • People want brands to take stands on important issues, and social media is the place for it. Two-thirds of consumers (66%) say it’s important for brands to take public stands on social and political issues, and more than half (58%) are open to this happening on social media – the top channel for consumer receptivity.
  • Brands can’t change minds, but they can effect change. Sixty-six percent of respondents say posts from brands rarely or never influence their opinions on social issues. Rather, respondents believe brands are more effective on social media when they announce donations to specific causes (39%) and encourage followers to take specific steps to support causes (37%), such as participating in events or making their own donations.
  • Liberals are galvanized by brands that take stands, while conservatives are indifferent. Seventy-eight percent of respondents who self-identify as liberal want brands to take a stand, while just about half (52%) of respondents who self-identify as conservative feel the same. Likewise, 82% of liberals feel brands are credible when taking stands, compared to just 46% of conservatives.
  • Relevance is key to reception. Consumers say brands are most credible when an issue directly impacts their customers (47%), employees (40%) and business operations (31%).
  • Brands face more reward than risk. Consumers’ most common emotional reactions to brands taking a stand on social were positive, with intrigued, impressed and engaged emerging as the top three consumer reactions. Likewise, when consumers’ personal beliefs align with what brands are saying, 28% will publicly praise a company. When individuals disagree with the brand’s stance, 20% will publicly criticize a company.

Instagram lessons

#instagram #lessons from The Guardian: nearly 860,000 followers, up 57% from a year ago. More interestingly, 60% of those who follow links to the Guardian’s site are new to the publisher.

“The content is a mix of original content made specifically for Instagram and existing assets — many of which are images pulled from major news stories and compiled into galleries to help tell the story in images.”

How the Guardian’s Instagram strategy is winning new readers

Headlines

“#audiences prefer long titles 97 characters, #SEO best practices: #Google advises to limit titles to 60 characters. #Facebook headlines of 40 characters perform best. On #Twitter, it’s between 71 and 100 characters. On #Linkedin, between 80 and 120.” Read more:

What_Makes_A_Great_Branded_Content_Headline_

  • Longer Headlines Improve CTR: Median CTR improves when headlines have more words and characters. Performance peaks at 90-99 characters and 15-16 words in length.
  • Use Numbers And Special Characters: CTR performance improves when numerical numbers and special characters ($, !, &, ?) are used in a headline.
  • Include Words That Relate To Your Topic: Including keywords that relate to the topic or category of your content will grab the reader’s attention and improved CTR performance.
  • ‘If It Bleeds It Leads’ Is Not Always True: When looking at both positive and negative words, the median CTR improves when positive words are used in a headline.

According to a Study, There’s a Good Chance You’ll Click This Headline Because It’s 97 Characters